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20130318
20130326
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of the middle east, and extraordinary new ways of looking at science and medicine when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the middle east where president obama is in the midst of a three day visit to israel it marks his first visit to the country as president, speaking in jerusalem today the president urged israelies to make sacrifices in the interests of sustainable peace with the palestinians. >> israelis must recognize that continued settlement activity is counterproductive to the cause of peace. and that an independent palestine must be viable, with real borders that have to be drawn. >> rose: the president also affirmed that america will continue to stand behind israel. he made a targeted appeal to the youth in attendance. >> and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, atem lo lavat. (applause) you are not alone. >> rose: joining me martin indyk, director o
find the answer in science, it leads to more questions. that is part of the fun. there are two aspects that are extremely strange, one is the power specter. it is as if you were listening to music and there was and i don't and the song. that is something that we see in the distribution of the spots on the cosmic mac background. and there is an even more i the thing, which is it seems to be tilted sort of in the plane, as if you were on a large ship and decided to leave your head. it is very odd. >> what does all of that mean? does it mean that the findings you are disputing ord is reorganizing how we think about the universe? >> it is probably reorganizing the thinking. this is a big discovery and science because we scientists like to put out theories. dairies are the best explanations of the data we have. -- theories are the best explanations of the data we have, but when we get new data, it means new theories. >> does it matter, we are talking 14 billion years, 15 billion, does it matter that it happened before we thought it happened, the big bang? >> let me make an analogy. suppose
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, t
. inthis is a new frontier science, to do -- use dna from two women and a man to create healthy child. nicolo is one of those that could be helped. she carries a faulty sell -- cause a host of illnesses. her mother died of mitochondrial disease. free of thechild disease. >> my mother died of the disease. i have watched many in my family develops symptoms generation after generation. to think that we could work this out at the beginning, at the start of a doll, you know, i cannot see why you would not. -- at the start of it all, you know, i cannot see where you would not. crucial genes from both parents would be removed, leaving behind the mother's fault the mitochondria. that is transferred to anoth woman's egg, carrying its own healthy mitochondria. the resulting embryo has the parent's genes, plus a tiny bit of dna from the second woman. crucially, that exegete -- extra dna would be passed down for generations. a scientific review found no evidence the technique is unsafe. now i public consultation carried out by fertility regulators has backed it, too. >> the bulk of the public who
the point in the introduction that even though economics is often called the dismal science, it's really a hopeful science. it's hopeful in the sense that we can point the way to the policies that can help us to recover and build a stronger economy for the future. and we can also point out some of the pitfalls. right now one of the major pitfalls we're facing one of the message head winds we're facing is sequester heading in the wrong direction. the budget cuts are occurring at a time when the economy is getting back on its feet. >> rose: you have a fundamental economic theory of the way the economy worked at a time like this that too much austerity and too much cutting will impede growth. >> i think we have to choose a responsibility balance path so i think that's right. we don't want too much cutting but at the same time we do need to address our long run fiscal problems. when the president came to office, we were not on a sustainable fiscal path because of the tax cuts because of the unpaid four wars because of demographics. so we need to do two things at once. we need to support the
, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is always pointed at al qaeda and al qaeda-linked groups. because they view the attacks to have the fingerprints of that organization. it was extremely coordinated attack as you saw, more than 20 bombs, many car bombs and then for good measure they threw in some suicide bombers as well as sticky bombs on the bottoms of buses. most shi'a target and security targets. that sits in to what al qaeda is doing, try to destabilize the country by showing people its security forces can't protect them and trying to stir up the sectarian war that this country has recently emerged from. if. >> woodruff: how unusual is it to have so many attacks on the same day? >> it was a bad day, that is certainly indisputable. i was at a university today talking to university students and they were holding a party because they were graduating. you can see the smo
. the journal "science translational medicine" published the findings today. the treatment is experimental and has only been used on five adult patients whose bodies resisted chemotherapy. the treatment genetically alters a patient's own immune cells to fight the cancer. one patient saw all traces of his leukemia disappear within eight days of treatment. and three of the five patients have now been in remission for five to 24 months. general motors announced a recall of 27,000 vehicles because of problems with their automatic transmissions. the recall affects the 2013 models of buick's full-size lacrosse cars and cadillac's s.r.x. crossover s.u.v. g.m. cited a software problem that could cause the transmission to shift to sport mode and increase the risk of a crash, although none have been reported. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we continue our focus on the middle east with a deeper look at the question of chemical weapons and their possible use in syria. i'm joined by leonard spector, deputy director of the monterey institute's center for nonp
they said they wanted to give. libraries, exiewrpt labs, science labs, beautiful building. they're being sent to a school that is much, much older, not in good shape, and not really equipped to handle the children with special needs. >> announcer: let me ask you the same question i asked him about whether and to what extent chicago is failing its student today. where do you see the failure and where do you see the cost? >> i mean, i don't understand the-- what we're talking about when we're talking about fail. we have been failing poor and minority children across this country. it's not just chicago. it's everywhere. and the issue is we don't want to have honest conversations about poverty because doing these other things and focusing the conversation somewhere else allows people to not talk about the other issues. so in the poorer parts ofÑi tow, children have not had access to good things, and then all of a sudden, we're starting to see that happen. almost every single school that is on the bubble here, we've seen a lot of resources put in lately. but some, not so much at all. so the
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most of them have, if journalism and the social science surveys are reporting what's actually going on out there. >> yeah, and i think that there has to be a change. i think most americans have to recognize that the folks who run our enterprises, they had to learn how to do that. and we can all learn how to do that. it's the old argument in a sense that comes out of our history. >> here's a viewer named jeff chiming in. "dr. wolff, can you please give a concrete, not academic or theoretical explanation, of how you would apply your employee-run business model to a mcdonald's, wal-mart, a hospital or jpmorgan chase?" >> well, the answer is best given not as a hypothetical but to describe an enterprise which is large like all of those are, which has done this. >> there's a film called "shift change," about the cooperative efforts. and we'll provide a link to that. >> well, the example i'm going to give is a company in spain. it's called mondragon, the mondragon cooperative corporation. and a little history may interest folks. it was started in the middle of the 1950s by a catholic prie
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)